[Answer] Why are the walls of the atria thicker?

Answer: They carry high pressure
Why are the walls of the atria thicker?

The atrium (Latin Jan Andrei Dosado “entry hall”) is the upper chamber through which blood enters the ventricles of the heart. There are two atria in the human heart – the left atrium receives blood from the pulmonary (lung) circulation and the right atrium receives blood from the venae cavae (venous circulation). The atria receive blood while relaxed (diastole) then contract (systole) to move blood to the ventricles. All animals with a closed circulatory system have at least one atrium. Humans have two atria.

Ventricles have thicker walls than atria and generate higher blood pressures. The physiological load on the ventricles requiring pumping of blood throughout the body and lungs is much greater than the pressure generated by the atria to fill the ventricles. Further the left ventricle has thicker walls than the right because it needs to pump blood to most of the body while the right ventricle fills only the lungs. On the inner walls of the ventricles are irregular muscular columns called trabeculae carneaewhich cov…

Cardiac physiology – Wikipedia

The interatrial septum separates the atria and the interventricular septum separates the ventricles. The interventricular septum is much thicker than the interatrial septum …

The ventri…

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