[Answer] Which stage of aerobic cellular respiration produces the most energy molecules?

Answer: Stage 2
Which stage of aerobic cellular respiration produces the most energy molecules?

Cellular respiration is a set of metabolic reactions and processes that take place in the cells of organisms to convert chemical energy from oxygen molecules or nutrients into adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and then release waste products. The reactions involved in respiration are catabolic reactions which break large molecules into smaller ones releasing energy because weak high-energy bonds in parti…

Cellular respiration is a set of metabolic reactions and processes that take place in the cells of organisms to convert chemical energy from oxygen molecules or nutrients into adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and then release waste products. The reactions involved in respiration are catabolic reactions which break large molecules into smaller ones releasing energy because weak high-energy bonds in particular in molecular oxygen are replaced by stronger bonds in the products. Respiration is one of the key ways a cell releases chemical energy to fuel cellular activity. The overall reaction occurs in a series of biochemical steps some of which are redox reactions. Although cellular respiration is technically a combustion reaction it clearly does not resemble one when it occurs in a living cell because of the slow controlled release of energy from the series of reactions. Nutrients that are commonly used by animal and plant cells in respiration include sugar amino acids and fatty acids and the most common oxidizing agent providing most of the chemical energy is molecular oxygen (O2). The chemical energy stored in ATP (the bond of its third phosphate group to the rest of the molecule can be broken allowing more stable products to form thereby releasing energy for use by the cell) can then be used to drive processes requiring energy including biosynthesis locomotion or transport of molecules across cell membranes.

Aerobic respiration requires oxygen (O2) in order to create ATP . Although carbohydrates fats and proteins are consumed as reactants aerobic respiration is the preferred method of pyruvate breakdown in glycolysis and requires pyruvate to the mitochondria in order to be fully oxidized by the citric acid cycle . The products of this process are carbon dioxide and water and the energy transferred is used …

Aerobic respiration requires oxygen (O2) in order to create ATP . Although carbohydrates fats and proteins are consumed as reactants aerobic respiration is the preferred method of pyruvate breakdown in glycolysis and requires pyruvate to the mitochondria in order to be fully oxidized by the citric acid cycle . The products of this process are carbon dioxide and water and the energy transferred is used to break bonds in ADP to add a third phosphate group to form ATP ( adenosine triphosphate ) by substrate-level phosphorylation NADH and FADH2 The negative ΔG indicates that the reaction can occur spontaneously. The potential of NADH and FADH2 is converted to more ATP through an electron transport chain with oxygen and protons (hydrogen) as the “terminal electron acceptors”. Most of the ATP produced by aerobic cellular respiration is made by oxidative phosphorylation . The energy of O2 released is used to create a chemiosmotic potential by pumping protons across a membrane. This potential is then used to drive ATP synthase and produce ATP from ADP and a phosphate group. Biology textbooks often state that 38 ATP molecules can be made per oxidized glucose molecule during cellular respiration (2 from glycolysis 2 from the Krebs cycle and about 34 from the electron transport system). However this maximum y…

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