[Answer] Which is a good practice to protect classified information?

Answer: Ensure proper labeling by appropriately marking all classified material and when required sensitive material.
Which is a good practice to protect classified information?

An example of a U.S. classified document; page 13 of a United States National Security Agency report on the USS Liberty incident partially declassified and released to the public in July 2003. The original overall classification of the page “Top Secret” code word UMBRA is shown at top and bottom. The classification of individual paragraphs and reference titles is shown in parentheses …

In June 2003 the U.S. Government announced that AES could be used to protect classified information : The design and strength of all key lengths of the AES algorithm (i.e. 128 192 and 256) are sufficient to protect classified information up to the SECRET level. TOP SECRET information will require use of either the 192 or 256 key lengths.

Save the Internet said this was an intentional act on the part of Cox Cable to protect classified ad services offered by its partners. The issue was resolved by correction of the software as well as a change in the network configuration used by Craig’s List. Craig’s List founder Craig Newmark stated that he believed the blocking was unintentional.

Toby Douglass you are correct – at least for protecting assets within the US government; when using AES the design and strength of 192 or 256 key lengths are sufficient to protect classified information up to the TOP SECRET level. As long as the implementation of A ES in products has been certified by the NSA prior to their acquisition or use.

Email controversy / classified…

Leave a Reply