[Answer] Where do macromolecules get energy?

Answer: macromolecules get energy from bonds
Where do macromolecules get energy?

A macromolecule is a very large molecule such as a protein.They are composed of thousands of covalently bonded atoms.Many macromolecules are the polymerization of smaller molecules called monomers.The most common macromolecules in …

Metabolic pathway – Wikipedia

Energy storage – Wikipedia

A core set of energy-producing catabolic pathways occur within all living organisms in some form. These pathways transfer the energy released by breakdown of nutrients into ATP and other small molecules used for energy (e.g. GTP NADPH FADH). All …

Carbohydrates are the most abundant biological molecules and fill numerous roles such as the storage and transport of energy (starch glycogen) and structural components (cellulose in plants chitin in animals). The basic carbohydrate units are called monosaccharides and include galactose fructose and most importantly glucose.

Wed Oct 17 2001 14:30:00 GMT-0400 (Eastern Daylight Time) · A polymer (/ ˈ p ɒ l ɪ m ər /; Greek poly- “many” + -mer “part”) is a substance or material consisting of very large molecules or macromolecules composed of many repeating subunits. Due to their broad spectrum of properties both synthetic and natural polymers play essential and ubiquitous roles in everyday life. Polymers range from familiar synthetic plastics such as polystyrene to …

Free energy change due to the depletion force. In the Asakura–Oosawa model for depletion forces the change in free- energy imposed by an excluded cosolute is: =where is the osmotic pressure and is the change in excluded volume (which is related to molecular size and shape). The very same result can be derived usin…

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