[Answer] When is the carbon stored in plants released?

Answer: when they die
When is the carbon stored in plants released?

As of September 2017 the Global CCS Institute identified 37 large-scale CCS facilities in its 2017 Global Status of CCS report which is a net decrease of one project since its 2016 Global Status of CCS report. 21 of these projects are in operation or in construction capturing more than 30 million tonnes of CO2 per annum. For the most current information see Large Scale CCS facilities on the Global CCS Institute’s website. For information on EU projects see Zero Emissions Platform website.

Autotrophs such as trees and other green plants use photosynthesis to convert carbon dioxide during primary production releasing oxygen in the process. This process occurs most quickly in ecosystems with high amounts of growth such as in young forests. Because carbon is consumed in the process of autotrophicgrowth more carbon is consumed in spring and summer during daytime than in winter and at night when photosynthesis no longer takes place in most plants. Carbon storage in the biosphere is infl…

Permafrost carbon cycle – Wikipedia

Permafrost carbon cycle – Wikipedia

Terrestrial biological carbon cycle – Wikipedia

Terrestrial biological carbon cycle – Wikipedia

5 – 20% of the total plant carbon fixed during photosynthesis is supplied as root exudates in support of rhizospheric mutualistic biota. [13] [14] Microbial populations are typically higher in the rhizosphere than in adjacent bulk soil .

Photosynthesis is a process used by plants and other organisms to convert light energy into chemical energy that through cellular respiration can later be released to fuel the organism’s metabolic activities.This chemical energy is stored in carbohydrate molecules such as sugars which are synthesized from carbon dioxide and water – hence the name photosynthesis from the Greek phōs …

About 500 gigatons of carbon are stored above ground in plants and other living organisms while soil holds approximately 1 500 giga…

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