[Answer] What was the result of the Supreme Court decision in Plessy v. Ferguson?

Answer: The doctrine of “separate but equal” was allowed to continue
What was the result of the Supreme Court decision in Plessy v. Ferguson?

Plessy v. Ferguson Final Ruling | World History Project

Ferguson – Plessy vs. Ferguson

Plessy vs. Ferguson Case: US History for Kids

Plessy v. Ferguson 163 U.S. 537 (1896) was a landmark decision of the U.S. Supreme Court that upheld the constitutionality of racial segregation laws for public facilities as long as the segregated facilities were equal in quality a doctrine that came to be known as “separate but equal”. The decision legitimated the many state laws re-establishing racial segregation that had been …

Plessy v. Ferguson 163 U.S. 537 (1896) was a landmark decision of the U.S. Supreme Court that upheld the constitutionality of racial segregation laws for public facilities as long as the segregated facilities were equal in quality a doctrine that came to be known as “separate but equal”. The decision legitimated the many state laws re-establishing racial segregation that had been passed in the American South after the end of the Reconstruction Era (1865–1877). The underlying case originated in 1892 when Homer Plessy an “octoroon” (person of seven-eighths white and one-eighth black ancestry) resident of New Orleans deliberately violated Louisiana’s Separate Car Act of 1890 which required “equal but separate” train car accommodations for white and non-white passengers. Upon being charged for boarding a “whites only” train car Plessy’s lawyers defended him by arguing that the law was unconstitutional. He lost at trial and his conviction was affirmed on his appeal to the Louisiana Supreme Court. Plessy then appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court which agreed to hear his case. In May 1896 the Supreme Court issued a 7–1 decision against Plessy ruling that the Louisiana law did not violate the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution stating that although the Fourteenth Amendment established the legal equality of white and black Americans it did not and could not require the elimination of all social or other “distinctions based upon color”. The Court rejected Plessy’s lawyers’ arguments that the Louisiana law inherently implied that black people were inferior and gave great deference to American state legislatures’ inherent power to make laws regulating health safety and morals—the “police power”—and to determine the reasonableness of the laws they passed. Justice John Marshall Harlan was the lone dissenter from the Court’s decision writing that the U.S. Constitution “is color-blind and neither knows nor tolerates classes among citizens” and so the law’s distinguishing of … Read more on Wikipedia

Incident In 1890 the state of Louisiana passed the Separate Car Act which required separate accommodations for blacks and whites on railroads including separate railway cars . Concerned a group of prominent black creole of color and white creole New Orleans residents formed the

Incident In 1890 the state of Louisiana passed the Separate Car Act which required separate accommodations for blacks and whites on railroads including separate railway cars . Concerned a group of prominent black creole of color and white creole New Orleans residents formed the Comité des Citoyens (Committee of Citizens) dedicated to repeal the law or fight its effect. They persuaded Homer Plessy a man of mixed race who was an ” octoroon ” (person of seven-eighths white and one-eighth black ancestry) to participate in an orchestrated tes…

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