[Answer] What is an electrostatic precipitator?

Answer: a device that captures particulates from a gas stream
What is an electrostatic precipitator?

Electrostatic precipitator – Wikipedia

Electrostatic precipitator – Wikipedia

Electrostatics – Wikipedia

Electrostatic precipitator – Wikipedia

An electrostatic precipitator (ESP) is a filtration device that removes fine particles like dust and smoke from a flowing gas using the force of an induced electrostatic charge minimally impeding the flow of gases through the unit. In contrast to wet scrubbers which apply energy directly to the flowing fluid medium an ESP applies energy only to the particulate matter being collected and therefore is very efficien…

An electrostatic precipitator (ESP) is a filtration device that removes fine particles like dust and smoke from a flowing gas using the force of an induced electrostatic charge minimally impeding the flow of gases through the unit. In contrast to wet scrubbers which apply energy directly to the flowing fluid medium an ESP applies energy only to the particulate matter being collected and therefore is very efficient in its consumption of energy (in the form of electricity).

The first use of corona discharge to remove particles from an aerosol was by Hohlfeld in 1824. However it was not commercialized until almost a century later. In 1907 Frederick Gardner Cottrell a professor of chemistry at the University of California Berkeley applied for a patent on a device for charging particles and then collecting them through

The first use of corona discharge to remove particles from an aerosol was by Hohlfeld in 1824. However it was not commercialized until almost a century later. In 1907 Frederick Gardner Cottrell a professor of chemistry at the University of California Berkeley applied for a patent on a device for charging particles and then collecting them through electrostatic attraction—the first electrostatic precipitator. Cottrell first applied the device to the collection of sulphuric acid mist and lead oxide fumes emitted from various acid-making and smelting activities. Wine-producing vineyards in northern California were being adversely affected by the lead emissions. At the time of Cottrell’s invention the theoretical basis for operation was not understood. The operational theory was developed later in Germany with the work of Walter Deutsch and the formation of the Lurgi company. Cottrell used proceeds from his invention to fund scientific research through the creation of a foundation called Research Corporation in 1912 to which he assigned the patents. The intent of the organization was to bring inventions made by educators (such as Cottrell) into the commercial world for the benefit of society at large. The operation of Research Corporation is funded by royalties paid by commercial firms after commercialization occu…

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