[Answer] What is a contraction?

Answer: Tension generated in a muscle regardless of its change in length.
What is a contraction?

Muscle contraction – Wikipedia

Muscle contraction – Wikipedia

Muscle contraction – Wikipedia

A contraction is a shortened version of the written and spoken forms of a word syllable or word group created by omission of internal letters and sounds. In linguistic analysis contractions should not be confused with crasis abbreviations and initialisms (including acronyms) with which they share some semantic and phonetic functions though all three are connoted by the term “abbreviation” in lo…

A contraction is a shortened version of the written and spoken forms of a word syllable or word group created by omission of internal letters and sounds. In linguistic analysis contractions should not be confused with crasis abbreviations and initialisms (including acronyms) with which they share some semantic and phonetic functions though all three are connoted by the term “abbreviation” in loose parlance. Contraction is also distinguished from clipping where beginnings and endings are omitted. The definition overlaps with the term portmanteau (a linguistic blend) but a distinction can be made between a portmanteau and a contraction by noting that contractions are formed from words that would otherwise appear together in sequence such as do and not whereas a portmanteau word is formed by combining two or more existing words that all relate to a singular concept that the portmanteau describes.

English has a number of contractions mostly involving the elision of a vowel (which is replaced by an apostrophe in writing) as in I’m for “I am” and sometimes other changes as well as in won’t for “will not” or ain’t for “am not”. These contractions are commonly used in speech and in informal writing though tend to be avoided in more formal writing (with limited exceptions such as the mandatory form …

English has a number of contractions mostly involving the elision of a vowel (which is replaced by an apostrophe in writing) as in I’m for “I am” and sometimes other changes as well as in won’t for “will not” or ain’t for “am not”. These contractio…

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