[Answer] What is A? A three base sequence on an mRNA molecule that codes for a specific amino acid

Answer: anticodon
What is A? A three base sequence on an mRNA molecule that codes for a specific amino acid

Sat Oct 13 2001 14:30:00 GMT-0400 (Eastern Daylight Time) · As in DNA genetic information in mRNA is contained in the sequence of nucleotides which are arranged into codons consisting of three ribonucleotides each. Each codon codes for a specific amino acid except the stop codons which …

A nucleic acid sequence is a succession of bases signified by a series of a set of five different letters that indicate the order of nucleotides forming alleles within a DNA or RNA molecule. By convention sequences are usually presented from the 5′ end to the 3′ end. For DNA the sense strand is used. Because nucleic acids are normally linear polymers specifying the sequence is equivalent to defining the covalent structure of the entire molecule. For this reason the nucleic acid sequence …

Protein metabolism – Wikipedia

Sense (molecular biology) – Wikipedia

Protein metabolism – Wikipedia

The mRNA nucleotide sequence is read in triplets – three adjacent nucleotides in the mRNA molecule correspond to a single codon. Each tRNA has an exposed sequence of three nucleotides known as the anticodon which are complementary in sequence to a specific codon that may be present in mRNA .

Each 3-base-pair-long segment of mRNA is a codon which corresponds to one amino acid or stop signal. Amino acids can have multiple codons that correspond to them. Ribosomes do not directly attach amino acids to mRNA codons. They must utilize tRNAs (transfer RNAs) as well.

Thu Oct 25 2001 14:30:00 GMT-0400 (Eastern Daylight Time) · A series of codons in part of a messenger RNA (mRNA) molecule. Each codon consists of three nucleotides usually corresponding to a single amino acid. The nucleotides are abbrevi…

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