[Answer] What happened on July 14 Bastille Day? Assessment

Answer: A mob rampaged into Paris killing the prisoners and guards and putting their heads on sticks walking around Paris. The Bastille also had all the weapons and gun powder and was destroyed brick by brick. Math 160 Final Review
What happened on July 14 Bastille Day? Assessment

Bastille Day is the common name given in English-speaking countries to the national day of France which is celebrated on 14 July each year. In French it is formally called Fête nationale and commonly and legally le 14 juillet (French pronunciation: ​[lə katɔʁz(ə) ʒɥijɛ]; “the 14th of July”). The French National Day is the anniversary of Storming of the Bastille on 14 July 1789 a turning point of the Frenc…

Bastille Day is the common name given in English-speaking countries to the national day of France which is celebrated on 14 July each year. In French it is formally called Fête nationale and commonly and legally le 14 juillet (French pronunciation: ​[lə katɔʁz(ə) ʒɥijɛ]; “the 14th of July”). The French National Day is the anniversary of Storming of the Bastille on 14 July 1789 a turning point of the French Revolution as well as the Fête de la Fédération that celebrated the unity of the French people on 14 July 1790. Celebrations are held throughout France. One that has been reported as “the oldest and largest military parade in Europe” is held on 14 July on the Champs-Élysées in Paris in front of the President of the Republic along with other French officials and foreign guests.

Jacques Necker the Finance Minister of Louis XVI who was sympathetic to the Third Estate was dismissed by the king on 11 July 1789. The people of Paris then stormed the Bastille fearful that they and their representatives would be attacked by the royal army or by foreign regiments of mercenaries in the king’s service and seeking to gain ammunition and gunpowder for the general populace. The …

Jacques Necker the Finance Minister of Louis XVI who was sympathetic to the Third Estate was dismissed by the king on 11 July 1789. The people of Paris then stormed the Bastille fearful that they and their representatives would be attacked by the royal army or by foreign regiments of mercenaries in the king’s service and seeking to gain ammunition and gunpowder for the general populace. The Bastille was a fortress-prison in Paris that had often held people jailed on the basis of lettres de cachet (literally “signet letters”) arbitrary royal indictments that could not be appealed and did not indicate the reason for the imprisonment. The Bastille held a large cache of ammunition and gunpowder and was also known for holding political prisoners whose writings had displeased the royal government and was thus a symbol of the absolutism of the monarchy. As it happened at the time of the attack in July 1789 there were only seven inmates none of great political significance. Preceding this on 14 July itself was the siege of Hôtel des Invalides ( Les Invalides ) for f…

Leave a Reply