[Answer] What does the place theory of pitch perception suggest?

Answer: Receptors on different portions of the basilar membrane are sensitive to sounds of different frequencies.
What does the place theory of pitch perception suggest?

Temporal theory (hearing) – Wikipedia

Temporal theory (hearing) – Wikipedia

Temporal theory (hearing) – Wikipedia

Place theory (hearing) – Wikipedia

Place theory is a theory of hearing that states that our perception of sound depends on where each component frequency produces vibrations along the basilar membrane. By this theory the pitch of a sound such as a human voice or a musical tone is determined by the places where the membrane vibrates based on frequencies corresponding to the tonotopic organization of the primary auditory …

Place theory holds that the perception of pitch is determined by the place of maximum excitation on the basilar membrane. A place code taking advantage of the tonotopy in the auditory system must be in effect for the perception of high frequencies since neurons have an upper limit on how fast they can phase-lock their action potentials. However a purely place-based theory cannot account for the …

Experiments to distinguish between place theory and rate theory using subjects with normal hearing are difficult to devise because of the strong correlation between rate and place: large vibrations at a low rate are produced at the apical end of the basilar membrane while large vibrations at a high rate are produced at the basal end. The two stimulus parameters can however be controlled independently using cochlear implants: pulses with a range of rates can be applied via different pairs of electrodes distributed along t…

Throughout the nineteenth century many theories and concepts of hearing were created. Ernest Wever proposed the volley theory in 1937 with his paper “The Perception of Low Tones and the Resonance-Volley Theory”. In this paper Wever discusses previous theories of…

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