[Answer] The gallbladder is on the ____________ surface of the liver.

Answer: Lateral
The gallbladder is on the ____________ surface of the liver.
The gallbladder is a hollow organ that sits in a shallow depression below the right lobe of the liver which is grey-blue in life. In adults the gallbladder measures approximately 7 to 10 centimetres (2.8 to 3.9 inches) in length and 4 centimetres (1.6 in) in diameter when fully distended. The gallbladder has a capacity of about 50 millilitres (1.8 imperial fluid ounces). The gallbladder is shaped like a pear with its tip opening into the cystic duct. The gallbladder is divided …
Cystic artery – Wikipedia
The liver is an organ only found in vertebrates which detoxifies various metabolites synthesizes proteins and produces biochemicals necessary for digestion and growth. In humans it is located in the right upper quadrant of the abdomen below the diaphragm. Its other roles in metabolism include the regulation of glycogen storage decomposition of red blood cells and the production of hormones. The liver is an accessory digestive organ that produces bile an alkaline fluid containing cholesterol and bile …
The quadrate lobe is an area of the liver situated on the under surface of the medial segment left lobe (Couinaud segment IVb) bounded in front by the anterior margin of the liver ; behind by the porta hepatis; on the right by the fossa for the gall-bladder ; and on the left by the fossa for the umbilical vein.
The bare area of the liver (nonperitoneal area) is a large triangular area on the diaphragmatic surface of the liver devoid of peritoneal covering. It is attached directly to the diaphragm by loose connective tissue.. The coronary ligament represent reflections of the visceral peritoneum covering the liver onto the diaphragm.As such between the two layers of the coronary ligament lies the …
The hepatobiliary triangle (or cystohepatic triangle) is an anatomic space bordered by the cystic duct inferiorly common hepatic duct medially and the inferior (viscer…

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