[Answer] In the two-kingdom system why were fungi classified in the kingdom Plantae?

Answer: They are sedentary
In the two-kingdom system why were fungi classified in the kingdom Plantae?

Sun May 26 2002 14:30:00 GMT-0400 (Eastern Daylight Time) · In biology kingdom (Latin: regnum plural regna) is the second highest taxonomic rank just below domain.Kingdoms are divided into smaller groups called phyla.Traditionally some textbooks from the United States and Canada used a system of six kingdoms (Animalia Plantae Fungi Protista Archaea/Archaebacteria and Bacteria/Eubacteria) while textbooks in Great …

A fungus (plural: fungi or funguses) is any member of the group of eukaryotic organisms that includes microorganisms such as yeasts and molds as well as the more familiar mushrooms.These organisms are classified as a kingdom which is separate from the other eukaryotic life kingdoms of plants and animals.. A characteristic that places fungi in a different kingdom …

Cavalier-Smith’s system of classification – Wikipedia

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Talk:Plantae – Wikipedia

Linnaeus’ original classification placed the fungi within the Plantae since they were unquestion ably neither animals or minerals and these were the only other alternatives. With 19th century developments in microbiology Ernst Haeckel introduced the new kingdom Protista in addition to Plantae and Animalia but whether fungi were best placed in the Plantae or …

By 1959 Robert Whittaker proposed that fungi which were formerly classified as plants be given their own kingdom. Therefore he divided life into four kingdoms such as: Protista (or unicellular organisms); Plantae (or multicellular plants); Fungi; and

Sat Jul 13 2002 14:30:00 GMT-0400 (Eastern Daylight Time) · The kingdom Plantae is defined in various ways by different biologists (see Current definitions of Plantae ).All definitions include the living embryophytes (la…

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