[Answer] How did the second theatre get closed down?

Answer: an ordinance (decree or legislation) was issued
How did the second theatre get closed down?

The Globe Theatre was a theatre in London associated with William Shakespeare. It was built in 1599 by Shakespeare’s playing company the Lord Chamberlain’s Men on land owned by Thomas Brend and inherited by his son Nicholas Brend and grandson Sir Matthew Brend and was destroyed by fire on 29 June 1613. A second Globe Theatre was built on the same site by June 1614 and closed by …

The Globe Theatre was a theatre in London associated with William Shakespeare. It was built in 1599 by Shakespeare’s playing company the Lord Chamberlain’s Men on land owned by Thomas Brend and inherited by his son Nicholas Brend and grandson Sir Matthew Brend and was destroyed by fire on 29 June 1613. A second Globe Theatre was built on the same site by June 1614 and closed by an Ordinance issued on 6 September 1642. A modern reconstruction of the Globe named “Shakespeare’s Globe” opened in 1997 approximately 750 feet (230 m) from the site of the original theatre. From 1909 the current Gielgud Theatre was called “Globe Theatre” until it was renamed (in honour of John Gielgud) in 1994.

Examination of old property records has identified the plot of land occupied by the Globe as extending from the west side of modern-day Southwark Bridge Road eastwards as far as Porter Street and from Park Street southwards as far as the back of Gatehouse Square. However the precise location of the building remained unknown until a small part of the foundations including one original pier bas…

Examination of old property records has identified the plot of land occupied by the Globe as extending from the west side of modern-day Southwark Bridge Road eastwards as far as Porter Street and from Park Street southwards as far as the back of Gatehouse Square. However the precise location of the building remained unknown until a small part of the foundations including one original pier base was discovered in 1989 by the Department of Greater London Archaeology (now Museum of London Archaeology ) beneath the car park at the rear of Anchor Terrace on Park Street. The shape of the foundations is now replicated on the surface. As th…

Leave a Reply