[Answer] amino acid is also known as a…?

Answer: peptide or protein
amino acid is also known as a…?

Amino acids are organic compounds that contain amino (–NH2) and carboxyl (–COOH) functional groups along with a side chain (R group) specific to each amino acid. The key elements of an amino acid are carbon (C) hydrogen (H) oxygen (O) and nitrogen (N) although other elements are found in the side chains of certain amino acids. About 500 naturally occurring amino acids are known as of 198…

Amino acids are organic compounds that contain amino (–NH2) and carboxyl (–COOH) functional groups along with a side chain (R group) specific to each amino acid. The key elements of an amino acid are carbon (C) hydrogen (H) oxygen (O) and nitrogen (N) although other elements are found in the side chains of certain amino acids. About 500 naturally occurring amino acids are known as of 1983 (though only 20 appear in the genetic code) and can be classified in many ways. They can be classified according to the core structural functional groups’ locations as alpha- (α-) beta- (β-) gamma- (γ-) or delta- (δ-) amino acids; other categories relate to polarity pH level and side chain group type (aliphatic acyclic aromatic containing hydroxyl or sulfur etc.). In the form of proteins amino acid residues form the second-largest component (water is the largest) of human muscles and other tissues. Beyond their role as residues in proteins amino acids participate in a number of processes such as neurotransmitter transport and biosynthesis. In biochemistry amino acids which have the amine group attached to the (alpha-) carbon atom next to the carboxyl group have particular importance. They are known as 2- alpha- or α-amino acids (generic formula H2NCHRCOOH in most cases where R is an organic substituent known as a “side chain”); often the term “amino acid” is used to refer specifically to these. They include the 22 proteinogenic (“protein-building”) amino acids which combine into peptide chains (“polypeptides”) to form the building blocks of a vast array of proteins. These are all L-stereoisomers (“left-handed” isomers) although a few D-amino acids (“right-handed”) occur in bacterial envelopes as a neuromodulator (D-serine) and in some antibiotics. Twenty of the proteinogenic amino acids are encoded directly by triplet codons in the genetic code and are known as “standard” amino acids. The other two (“nonstandard” or “non-canonical”) are selenocysteine (present in many prokaryotes as well as most eu… Read more on Wikipedia

The first few amino acids were discovered in the early 19th century. In 1806 French chemists Louis-Nicolas Vauquelin and Pierre Jean Robiquet isolated a compound in asparagus that was subsequently named asparagine the first amino acid to be discovered. Cystine was discovered in 1810 although its monomer cysteine remained undiscovered until 1884. Glycine

The first few amino acids were discovered in the early 19th century. In 1806 French chemists Louis-Nicolas Vauquelin and Pierre Jean Robiquet isolated a compound in asparagus that was subsequently named asparagine the first amino acid to be discovered. Cystine was discovered in 1810 although its monomer cysteine remained undiscovered until 1884. Glycine and leucine were discovered in 1820. The last of the 20 common amino acids to be discovered was threonine in 1935 by William Cumming Rose who also determined the essential amino acids and established the minimum daily requirements of all amino acids for optimal growth. The un…

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