[Answer] According to Mead’s “I and me” theory how does the “I” differ from the “me?”

Answer: …
According to Mead’s “I and me” theory how does the “I” differ from the “me?”

The ‘I’ and the ‘me’ are terms central to the social philosophy of George Herbert Mead one of the key influences on the development of the branch of sociology called symbolic interactionism. The terms refer to the psychology of the individual where in Mead’s understanding the “me” is the socialized aspect of the person and the “I” is the active aspect of the person. One might usefully ‘compare …

The ‘I’ and the ‘me’ are terms central to the social philosophy of George Herbert Mead one of the key influences on the development of the branch of sociology called symbolic interactionism. The terms refer to the psychology of the individual where in Mead’s understanding the “me” is the socialized aspect of the person and the “I” is the active aspect of the person. One might usefully ‘compare Mead’s “I” and “me” respectively with Sartre’s “choice” and “the situation”. But Mead himself matched up the “me” with Freud’s “censor” and the “I” with his “ego”; and this is psychologically apt.

The “Me” is what is learned in interaction with others and (more generally) with the environment: other people’s attitudes once internalized in the self constitute the Me. This includes both knowledge about that environment (including society) but also about who the person is: their sense of self. “What the individual is for himself is not something that he invented. It is what his significant others

The “Me” is what is learned in interaction with others and (more generally) with the environment: other people’s attitudes once internalized in the self constitute the Me. This includes both knowledge about that environment (including society) but also about who the person is: their sense of self. “What the individual is for himself is not something that he invented. It is what his significant others have come to …treat him as being.” This is because people learn to see who they are (man or woman old or young etc.) by observing the responses of others to themselves or their actions. If others respond to a person as (for instance) a woman the person develops a sense of herself indeed as a woman. At the same time ‘the “Me” disciplines the “I” by holding it back from breaking the law of the community’. It is thus very close to the way in a man Freud’s ‘ego-censor the conscience…arose from the critical influence of his parents (conveyed to him by the medium of the voice) to whom were added as time went on those who trained and taught him and the innumerable and indefinable host of all the other people in his environment—his fellow-men—and public opinion’. It is ‘the attitude of the other in one’s own organism as controlling the thing that he is going to do’. By contrast ‘the “I” is the response of the individual to the attitude of the community’. The “I” acts creatively though within the context of the me. Mead notes that “It is only after we have acted that we know what we have done…what we have said.” People he argues are not automatons; Mead states that “the “I” reacts to the self which arises though the taking of the attitude of others.” They do not blindly follow rules. They construct a response on the basis of what they have learned the “me”. Mead highlig… Read more on Wikipedia

Thu Nov 22 2012 13:30:00 GMT-0500 (Eastern S…

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